WII Monday, April 7, 2008 | 11:20 PM

Sadness cries a screenshot

Sadness cries a screenshot

Oh Sadness, so many delays, when will it be launched? The Wii is in need of a new videogame in the horror genre. According to Nibris' president, Piotr Orlovsky, this production is intended only for adults and touches various subjects as fear of the dark, paranoid schizophrenia and narcolepsy. The events unfold in a Slavic country during World War I. For now, the release date is set to 2008, maybe Q1 2009.


It's important to note that all of Sadness will be in black & white with a gothic style. The problem about this game is that the company promised a gameplay trailer before the end of 2007, which never happenned. As of March 17, 2007, publisher Frontline Studios parted ways due to different "artistic differences", leaving Nibris with no publisher. The developer has approached Digital Amigos since then, but no further details are available. The following screen has been posted on IGN's official boards by Nibris. Viral marketing to boost interest in their slowly vanishing project from the masses? You bet.

All comments

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Commented on 2008-04-07 23:49:10
wish they released this on the 360 or ps3..
Commented on 2008-04-08 00:02:00 In reply to Splicer261
Posted by Splicer261
wish they released this on the 360 or ps3..
I just wish they'd release it at once
Commented on 2008-04-08 00:06:08
If they're doing half as good a job as they imply, they'd need to castrate it beyond recognition to put it on a different platform than the Wii.

Let's hope it more of an Eternal Darkness and less of a Geist eh? :)
Commented on 2008-04-08 00:39:18
"this production is intended only for adults and touches various subjects as fear of the dark, paranoid schizophrenia and ******narcolepsy*******"

Touches on a condition which means the body can't define sleep patterns correctly? Doesn't make sense O_O
Commented on 2008-04-08 00:49:32 In reply to citizenx
Posted by citizenx
"this production is intended only for adults and touches various subjects as fear of the dark, paranoid schizophrenia and ******narcolepsy*******"

Touches on a condition which means the body can't define sleep patterns correctly? Doesn't make sense O_O
Exact quote : "The scenario will have associations with narcolepsy, nyctophobia and paranoid schizophrenia. The scenario will surprise you."
Commented on 2008-04-08 00:58:10
My Wii is waiting it so long
Commented on 2008-04-08 01:19:55
Serves them right for trying to be original! Now when are we going to see some Fatal Frame 4 footage...
Commented on 2008-04-08 01:24:23
This game doesn't exist, it never existed. It's a fantasy, maybe joke created by fictional company called Nibris. Trust me, waiting for Sadness is pointless.
Commented on 2008-04-08 01:24:50
I love the concept
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNjyw-D1YP0
Commented on 2008-04-08 01:49:30 In reply to ACEfromRussia
Posted by ACEfromRussia
I love the concept
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNjyw-D1YP0
Based on that video which not only uses real actors but also motion controls the Wiimote could never do, Alone in the Dark 5 looks like that game made real...
Commented on 2008-04-08 02:01:44 In reply to Jigen
Posted by Jigen
...motion controls the Wiimote could never do
Err, no.

You'd be amazed at how much stuff the Wiimote registers and how much you CAN indeed do with it.
Posted by dante2003
...fictional company called Nibris...
Raid over the river looks pretty good considering it's made by a fictional company.
Commented on 2008-04-08 02:05:31 In reply to SimonM7
Posted by SimonM7
Err, no.

You'd be amazed at how much stuff the Wiimote registers and how much you CAN indeed do with it.
Umm yes, you'd be amazed at how limited the thing actually is. The torch flicking part wouldn't be possible unless you were only able to aim the thing down around your knees as it is in the video (because the sensor bar would be required for any kind of accuracy, of course they could have the camera swing around for greater degree of movement, but that's not what the video showed), the rope part would have to be completely gesture based and scripted, and thus very lame (there would be no skill involved, just swing the wiimote), the swinging of the arms to move vines or attack would have to be a simple 'swing arm' motion, same with the impaling part, you'd have to enter a piece in the gameplay where it said "now move the wiimote up, then down", and of course the umbrella segment is just silly, there's no way the Wii would know where you were holding the Wiimote other than it would be pointing upwards.

People expect WAYYY too much out of the Wiimote and then blame developers for not doing what is TECHNICALLY IMPOSSIBLE. It annoys me to no end!
Commented on 2008-04-08 02:11:31 In reply to Jigen
Everything can be done - and is best done - without the wiimote knowing where it is in relation to anything, using the accelerometers in it. Plenty of games have already used motion that way without pointing at the screen, and the gyroscopic functions used in tandem with accelerometers yield brill results. Play some No More Heroes, then fire up the fencing mini game in Secret Rings, then just imagine both of them used simultaniously.

I'm not saying it'll necessarily make a great game, litting fires here and there, but it's absolutely possible. Lack of imagination isn't a tech issue.
Commented on 2008-04-08 02:16:43 In reply to SimonM7
Posted by SimonM7
Everything can be done - and is best done - without the wiimote knowing where it is in relation to anything, using the accelerometers in it. Plenty of games have already used motion that way without pointing at the screen, and the gyroscopic functions used in tandem with accelerometers yield brill results. Play some No More Heroes, then fire up the fencing mini game in Secret Rings, then just imagine both of them used simultaniously.

I'm not saying it'll necessarily make a great game, litting fires here and there, but it's absolutely possible. Lack of imagination isn't a tech issue.
When does No More Heroes ever do what you just said. I've never played it because it seemed incredibly boring to me in previews/reviews/and everything else. From the videos I've seen it seems to show you which direction to swing the remote as a finishing move, that's not the same thing at all. That is a scripted event with a search for input. Same with Secret Rings, didn't get that either. Obviously the whole 'imagine them both simultaneously' is a big problem too. Imagine batting in Wii Sports while aiming in Metroid Prime 3, it's not possible.

Anyways, it is a tech issue, I understand how the thing works, and sadly they've convinced a LOT of people that it can do more than it really can.
Commented on 2008-04-08 02:26:42
So you played neither but you know that imagining them together is impossible? That's an impressive deduction.

Lemme help out then.

Secret Rings merely senses how you hold the wiimote in a fixed position. Tilt it forward and you'll point the rapier downwards, back, left, right, it follows how you point the wiimote to EERILY accurate effect.

Now imagine reaching a point where you're supposed to lit a rope on fire, you hit a context sensitive button and it locks into a NMH state which has your torch responding like the rapier did from SaTSR. You might even be able to "Z-lock" strafe around to get in position, or use the nunchuk's motion controls to hunch down or adjust your height in some way. You then tilt the wiimote into the right position and hold it there to set fire to the rope.

There's no need to always go waving the torch around.

It is not a tech issue - that's just a bedtime story told to people to make them feel good about not having motion controls at all because "it really can't do much anyway". You have a ton of variables to work with, and how you use them is entirely up to your imagination and sense of what would be fun to do and what wouldn't.

I don't doubt that you understand how it works, but you do seem to lack an enthusiasm for thinking up what you can do with the way it does work.
Commented on 2008-04-08 02:42:49 In reply to SimonM7
Posted by SimonM7
So you played neither but you know that imagining them together is impossible? That's an impressive deduction.

Lemme help out then.

Secret Rings merely senses how you hold the wiimote in a fixed position. Tilt it forward and you'll point the rapier downwards, back, left, right, it follows how you point the wiimote to EERILY accurate effect.

Now imagine reaching a point where you're supposed to lit a rope on fire, you hit a context sensitive button and it locks into a NMH state which has your torch responding like the rapier did from SaTSR. You might even be able to "Z-lock" strafe around to get in position, or use the nunchuk's motion controls to hunch down or adjust your height in some way. You then tilt the wiimote into the right position and hold it there to set fire to the rope.

There's no need to always go waving the torch around.

It is not a tech issue - that's just a bedtime story told to people to make them feel good about not having motion controls at all because "it really can't do much anyway". You have a ton of variables to work with, and how you use them is entirely up to your imagination and sense of what would be fun to do and what wouldn't.

I don't doubt that you understand how it works, but you do seem to lack an enthusiasm for thinking up what you can do with the way it does work.
I base my knowledge upon technical knowledge and personal experience with the system in general. I am not easily confused by game mechanics that cover up deficiencies in the control.

With regards to your Secret Rings example, that's easily enough explained. The Wiimote (like the Sixaxis btw) can detect positioning very well within the six axies of 'spin'. Does that game also require you to aim at the sensor bar? That's how you get lateral/updown/forward back spacial movement in Wii games...

I'm not arguing that you can't do what the video shows by locking the player into specific modes with a HUD, unless you simply expected the user to mess around until they figured out when the controls were swapped.

The problems really come in with stuff like making the game clunky, and/or basically filling a game with gimmicks that add nothing to the game. In your 'light the rope' example I can think of a lot of REAL implementation issues that would arise. But let's say they can get past stuff like "oh the user is too far away in 3d space, and has to move the wiimote too close to the sensor to actually light the rope". What does this add to the game? A level of immersion is the only possible benefit I can think of, with the tradeoff being possible control issues if every scenario isn't handled well enough by the developers. Still, the rope throwing example in the video is utterly impossible to convey with any accuracy at all without changing the motions the player is shown doing.

Have you watched the videos of Alone in the Dark 5? That shows a way to do some of this with only 2 analog sticks, and that would be a more fluid system than the wiimote implementation we've described.
Commented on 2008-04-08 03:27:41
Context sensitive things like spinning wheels in Gears to have a lift go across a chasm don't have any trouble finding the player in a 3D space. As for the wiimote sensor, the sensor isn't even used in the Secret Rings example I mentioned. It's based purely on the gyro in it.

It's no more clunky than any other context sensitive action, and it can easily be likened to holding a button to ready the bow/boomerang in Zelda, then adjusting the wiimote accordingly to perform the action. Gimmicks are at some point up to each and every one of us to define, as some would call the entire console a gimmick. Is opening cabinets in Eledees/Elebits gimmicky? Maybe it is, I dunno. To me it was a fun quirk to gameplay that I happily performed.

It's difficult to really know the setup of this game, its pacing. If it's slow, methodical and puzzly like Zack and Wiki (absolutely brilliant game by the way) then I can easily imagine the sort of solution I described. If it's more actiony then you'd obviously want something more immediate.

However, none of those are questions I set out to answer. I merely objected to your notion that it can't be successfully emulated on the Wii, and I simply reckon it can.

The whole "this and that works just as well on a normal gamepad" is a bit of a moot point too when you consider that the whole idea here is to shake up conventional controls to create something that feels different. Of course you could have simple shortcut buttons for all the shoryukens in gaming because that would arguably be "less gimmicky" than the motion you have to perform on the d-pad, but without obstacles and a BIT of jumping through hoops, games would be rediculously straight forward.

To what extent that is true for you I can't answer, but for me personally I can enjoy a methodical, somewhat "cumbersome" game if it's done in a stimulating way. Lost in Blue isn't entirely lost on me for instance.
Commented on 2008-04-08 04:52:11 In reply to SimonM7
Posted by SimonM7
Context sensitive things like spinning wheels in Gears to have a lift go across a chasm don't have any trouble finding the player in a 3D space. As for the wiimote sensor, the sensor isn't even used in the Secret Rings example I mentioned. It's based purely on the gyro in it.

It's no more clunky than any other context sensitive action, and it can easily be likened to holding a button to ready the bow/boomerang in Zelda, then adjusting the wiimote accordingly to perform the action. Gimmicks are at some point up to each and every one of us to define, as some would call the entire console a gimmick. Is opening cabinets in Eledees/Elebits gimmicky? Maybe it is, I dunno. To me it was a fun quirk to gameplay that I happily performed.

It's difficult to really know the setup of this game, its pacing. If it's slow, methodical and puzzly like Zack and Wiki (absolutely brilliant game by the way) then I can easily imagine the sort of solution I described. If it's more actiony then you'd obviously want something more immediate.

However, none of those are questions I set out to answer. I merely objected to your notion that it can't be successfully emulated on the Wii, and I simply reckon it can.

The whole "this and that works just as well on a normal gamepad" is a bit of a moot point too when you consider that the whole idea here is to shake up conventional controls to create something that feels different. Of course you could have simple shortcut buttons for all the shoryukens in gaming because that would arguably be "less gimmicky" than the motion you have to perform on the d-pad, but without obstacles and a BIT of jumping through hoops, games would be rediculously straight forward.

To what extent that is true for you I can't answer, but for me personally I can enjoy a methodical, somewhat "cumbersome" game if it's done in a stimulating way. Lost in Blue isn't entirely lost on me for instance.
Well my main beef is the video does show things which are technically impossible. Sure you can change up things and make some of the features work, and still many of the things would lack their entire purpose as shown in the video. I'd LOVE a control mechanism that would let me throw a lasso like shown in that video, but it's simply not possible, with the Wiimote or any other current game controller.

I'm not a huge fan of context sensitive actions, and I outright dislike them if they're too arbitrary or not implemented well. Take the cover system in Army of Two (based upon the coop demo), that's a case of context sensitive controls that doesn't work at all IMO. You could change many things in the video to work in some manner, but many wouldn't work the same (or as nicely) as the video would make you believe.

I think a gimmick can be fairly well defined as something that adds nothing, or very little at all to a game. I would argue that opening drawers and such in Elebits is not a gimmick at all because it's skill based and it works with other gameplay elements like the physics, pick up a dresser and the drawers will open up as well. The aiming of the Wiimote in Super Paper Mario to change the world dimensions is a very annoying gimmick for example.

I believe if there's a simple action that can be taken instead of something needlessly complex, it should always be done. A GREAT example of this would be in New Super Mario Bros on DS. They could have had you pressed any number of the unused buttons to bring down the extra item held in storage (like pressing select in Super Mario World), but instead they have you press the touch screen. That is a gimmick. So basically if they can have me press the D-pad or go through some motion, which may not even register correctly, they should pick the D-pad every time.

Lost in Blue is a borderline example, I didn't find the little mini-things annoying, but there are many factors involved as you say, the pace of the game, the context, and the accuracy of the input. A counter example is in Resident Evil DS, where I literally quit the game because in the basement near Plant 42 you have to turn a wheel valve and the input is so broken in the game that it's no simple task. This both defies logic and breaks the gameplay. That is another good example of a gimmick that directly hurt gameplay instead of improving it at all.
Commented on 2008-04-08 05:23:44
Wow you guys got into an argument real fast
Commented on 2008-04-08 05:27:36 In reply to Kudgel
Posted by Kudgel
Wow you guys got into an argument real fast
I wouldn't call it an argument, but really this is what forums should be for.

Sadly most moderators think big, well thought out posts are bad and short quips like "I hate it, it sux" are OK.
Commented on 2008-04-08 07:24:32 In reply to Jigen
Posted by Jigen
I wouldn't call it an argument, but really this is what forums should be for.

Sadly most moderators think big, well thought out posts are bad and short quips like "I hate it, it sux" are OK.
This isn't what I was trying to say, in fact I was impressed by their texts that is all. Nothing bad here.
Commented on 2008-04-08 07:47:48
It'd be nice if people stopped being hard on the Wii on this board for no valid reason
Commented on 2008-04-08 08:41:30
Releasing a real game with a story on the Wii?
They should just up the graphics and release it on 360/PS3 where it might make some money
Commented on 2008-04-08 10:58:22 In reply to newbielives
Posted by newbielives
Releasing a real game with a story on the Wii?
They should just up the graphics and release it on 360/PS3 where it might make some money
As much as I hate to agree, that seems like the case with Wii. While it's definitely a very clever system, the audience that gets into Wii are not the kind of gamers (if they can even be called that) that would buy a game like this. I have friends who own Wiis, and not a single one of them own a third party game aside from Smash, Galaxy and a splattering of sport games. They absolutely do not turn on their Wii ever until they got a bunch of friends over.

Even if the Wii will have the biggest install base out of the 3 competing consoles, only a tiny fraction of them will buy anything that isn't some kind of sport or party game. And those who do usually are people who already own a PS3 or 360. But i can already tell you that there's 7 Wii owners I know who will not give this game or anything thing like it a single second of consideration. I think Capcom has gone through something similar with their GC titles not doing too well, and I don't blame them for more or less abandoning the Wii.
Commented on 2008-04-08 12:10:16 In reply to Jigen
Well it's difficult to really disagree with what you're saying, but there are a few things I'd like to point out.

For one, while I agree that a gimmick is easily defined per se, it's up to each of us to determine what does or doesn't add something to a game. I'd argue, personally, that "well implemented" and "gimmick" are opposites of the exact same thing; input mechanics. No more no less.

Much like something like chess is about limiting options, creating rules within a confined space, controls are really the same. Mario has to jump over pits, Sonic has to avoid sharp spikes, et cetera.

To level up and become strong in an RPG takes time and effort. They could stick you with all the powers at the outset because that'd be the "simple intuitive way" but that'd defeat the whole purpose.

Magnify this thinking a couple of times and move onto controls. It's easy to see how obstacles are often loaded onto the controls instead. Pressing a button to reload is all about clearing an obstacle when it could just aswell be automatic and all you had to concentrate on would be the trigger.

As I was alluding to earlier, powerful moves in fighting games could easily be put on buttons, but instead they're performed by using some elaborate motion on the d-pad.

Now, after a bizillion years of essentially doing the same things to achieve stuff, the Wii comes along and does stuff differently. This is bound to confuse and aggrevate some people as tried and true inputs are exchanged for new, sometimes a bit awkward things.

Here is where I guess we differ. To me, the actions visualised in a game are secondary, sometimes tertiary to *what you are doing* - a shell in which game mechanics are encapsulated. Looking at a gamepad you don't see *jumping, shooting, climbing, slashing, moving falling blocks around, drifting around a corner, saving the princess, killing the giants, eating a mushroom* because it's really not there to be seen. Of course, you COULD see it, but that's because we've had SO many years of jumping on A and shooting on B.

So what's gimmicky about using something else to jump and shoot? That's like always using the death of an established and loved character to make people cry in EVERY work of art because that's how you make people cry.

I simply disagree that moving actions from an established spot on your input device to another alltogether is gimmicky. It's a bad idea if it doesn't work out or isn't fun of course, but that's sort of a different matter. If you're making a bad game - regardless of how you make the character jump - then that's gonna be a bad game.

I've played a number of Wii games that are straight up ports with swapped control schemes, and those have been varying degrees of successful. Mainly they're hard to get into because your body goes "WAAH, I've seen this before and the A button used to do this and that!!", but that's just your body responding to the visual input fooling you into thinking it's the same game when it ultimately sort of isn't. SSX Blur is a brill example of a game that will put you off as long as your mind is fixed on SSX3/On Tour, but is actually really cool when you let go and get into it.

Aaaanyhow, like I said semantics aside we're pretty much agree. Well except for the whole.. me thinking this game based on this conceptual video is very much a Lost in Blue/Zack and Wiki like possibility, but that's prolly due to my openness to context sensitive actions. I think they've come a long way in the last few years and I think Twilight Princess, Resident Evil 4 and Sands of Time are a few great examples of it off the top of my head.
Posted by willdabeast
...the audience that gets into Wii are not the kind of gamers (if they can even be called that) that would buy a game like this...
You got me, I'm not a gamer. :D

I think the whole Wii install base thing is confusing to people because it's gotten off to such an incredible start, and a lot of that success is tied to non-gamers buying into it. If those weren't wowed we would've seen a slower rise to (prolly lesser) success for sure (look at any other console) but the notion that "gamers" don't have a Wii is starting to become a tiresome misconception.

Capcom has already put three million sellers on the Wii, two of which are essentially new IP, and more support is coming. The closest is the Wii version of Okami in.. april I think. We Love Golf was featured on this site a while ago, Monster Hunter 3 is announced as a Wii exclusive, Sengoku Basara X/Devil Kings X is coming out alongside the PS2 version this year, and rumours are circulating about Zack and Wiki and Umbrella Chronicles sequels. So yeah, I look forward to continued abandonment from capcom.
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